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Supports, Bandages

Shop our range of foot supports for toes and feet, as well as our selection of supports and bandages for wrists, elbows, fingers and thumbs. Sore feet from bunions, blisters, corns and sore spots can be irritating and slow you down in everyday movement, as can problems with your hands, wrists and finger movements, which we often take for granted. Get the support you need for your hands, feet and body to heal problematic areas naturally with our selection of bandage supports for everyday use.

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All you need to know about Supports, Bandages

What is a support bandage?

A support bandage is a type of bandage that you can wear following a strain or injury. The bandage helps to support the wound and prevent further injury or damage to muscles and tissue.

Can insoles really help?

If you struggle with pain when walking and pressure points hurt on your feet, an insole could work wonders for you. Many people wear insoles for a variety of reasons, such as realigning the placement of the feet when walking, helping with inflammation of the knees, lower back, hips and pain in tendons. You should consult your GP if you feel you might need insoles to help when walking.

How long should I wear a thumb splint for?

You should always wear a thumb splint as recommended by your GP, who should give you information on how long you can wear it for on a daily basis. Most people find that their thumb is in a cast for around 5-6 weeks, and will require several weeks of physiotherapy and exercises, as well as support in a thumb splint, before gaining full mobility.

I have carpal tunnel syndrome – do I need to wear a splint?

If you have carpal tunnel syndrome, it is likely that your GP will instruct that you wear a splint at night for a few weeks to hold the joint and support it. This is because symptoms and discomfort may be worse at night when you move your arms and hands involuntarily while sleeping. Studies have shown that wearing a splint is only a short-term solution offering temporary relief. If your hand still hurts, consult your GP.

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